Scope & Concerns

Policing is a profession that works at the frontier of social order and disorder. The immediate signs of disorder are crime and violence. But the key to navigating this frontier lies deeper—in poverty, gender, racism and a range of other points of social fracture. This research network addresses the evolving roles and challenges of professional policing from three perspectives: the changing nature of the profession of policing; best practices of policing in the context of community diversity; and police education and training. Its focus is on success narratives, where participants in the research network document and analyze their experiences or the experiences of others in case studies of successful policing strategies from the US or around the world.

Themes

Theme 1: The Profession of Policing

  • Discretionary power and professional police practice
  • The ethics of policing: considering consequences, weighing justifiable ends
  • Kinds of crime and types of response: economic, cyber, violent, domestic, hate, virtual, and other kinds of crime
  • Emergency response and responders: inter-practice dialogues
  • Digital policing: body cameras, surveillance systems, digital profiles, and other data
  • Data-driven and predictive policing
  • Profiling: the sources of interpretive information and their difficulties
  • Big data and AI (artificial intelligence) at work: benefits and challenges
  • Safety for police and their interactants, in principle and practice
  • Strategies for non-escalation and de-escalation
  • Policing standards: policy and regulation of police practice
  • Crises and policing and police reform
  • Private and public policing: roles, responsibilities, relations
  • The culture of police leadership and management
  • Participation without appearing disruptive: management of diverse perspectives in a hierarchical organization
  • Navigating threats: questions of safety and security
  • Harm profiles and harm reduction
  • Emotion, empathy, affect in person-to-person relations
  • Learning to manage emotional stress, wellness, and mental and physical health
  • Managing trigger behaviors and anger: police and interactants
  • Judgement and modulation in the use of force
  • Duty to intervene: disrupting codes of silence
  • Innovation and best practice in policing: international case studies and comparisons
  • Towards diversity in policing: recruitment, retention, and professional advancement
  • In the line of duty: risk and reward in policing
  • Duties of care and service in policing
  • Measures of police performance standards of accountability

Theme 2: Police Practice as Mutual Learning or Educative Dialogue in Diverse Communities

  • The role of police in the ideal of neighborhood
  • Addressing the dimensions of community diversity: material (poverty, locale, etc.), embodied (race, sex/sexuality, age, dis/ability, etc.), and cultural (ethnicity, group affinity, education level, etc.)
  • Recognizing the impact of sexism, racism, homophobia and other antisocial orientations to diversity
  • Policing in the context of human and civil right
  • Policing and politics
  • Lives that matter: police community protest and support movements
  • Strategies for police-public engagement
  • Initiating and orchestrating community dialogue
  • Crime prevention
  • Restorative justice
  • Police actions, accountability, and community legitimacy
  • Police in the mass media and social media
  • Social capital and community cohesion
  • Privacy considerations in community policing
  • Collaborative intelligence: strategies for sharing community and police knowledge
  • Recalibrating the roles and responsibilities of police in relation to other social services
  • Differentiation and specialization of policing roles
  • Evaluating and researching police effectiveness

Theme 3: Police Education and Training

  • Police agencies and their cultures as learning organizations
  • Ubiquitous, on-the-job learning
  • e-Learning approaches to online and blended police education and training
  • Police leaders as professional and community educators
  • Military styles of training: when are they appropriate, or not?
  • Simulation and gamification in police education and training
  • AR/VR (Artificial Reality/Virtual Reality) in police training
  • Changing the delivery modes: online and blended in-person
  • Consistency and context-sensitive variation in police education and training
  • Metacognition and mindfulness as paths to self-efficacy and professionalism
  • Training the police trainer: models and practices
  • e-Learning ecologies: reach, efficiency, and quality of interactions
  • Assessing learning outcomes and evaluating programs
  • The place of education and training in career development